Past events

ThoughtLuck Series (online)

"ThoughtLuck" is a space for discussion, sharing, and listening. The conversations will be centered on the experiences of those who self-identify as Asian American in the bubble of Western classical music—unwrapping issues of identity, racism, cultural politics, social justice, artistic freedom, etc..

Check out notes from our past ThoughtLuck meetings on our Resources page. 

Friday, May 6, 2022 at the Pao Arts Center, Boston, MA

Our Objects and Possibilities explored AAPI storytelling through performances of works by AAPI composers, interwoven with readings of works by AAPI writers. Objects—whether they are things of everyday use, poems, or songs—become treasured memories, especially for diasporic and immigrant communities, inspiring our individual and collective destinies. 

The event created a collective space for storytelling by our diverse AAPI community of creatives - composers, musicians, and writers - and celebrated our most primal need to connect with our destinies, past, present, and future. Performers included violinists Lucia Lin, Jae Lee, and Hyeyung Sol Yoon, violist Sarah Darling, cellist Leo Eguchi, and harpist Charles Overton.

Sunday, May 23, 2021 at 114 E. 35th St., NY, NY

May is Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) Heritage Month, and a perfect opportunity to celebrate the contributions of the Asian community and bring awareness to recent and systemic issues.

PROTESTRA will be presenting Music in Action: Heritage Against Hate, a live in-person event featuring chamber and solo works composed and performed by AAPI identifying musicians, a gallery exhibition of original artwork, and a post-concert discussion hosted by Asian Musical Voices of America.

October 20, 2020 (online)

Workshop led by Byron Au Yong and Meena Malik

How can historical knowledge address the current moment? How can we use this community to support one another? What are some actionable steps that we can take individually and as a group to make meaningful changes in our lives and in our work?

October 13, 2020 (online)

Workshop led by Meena Malik

Artists are increasingly straining against their funding sources. Foundations and donors with an interest in “the arts” are often rich, white, and interested in the classics. Even with the best of intentions, artists and funders are wrapped up in a capitalist economic model. How do artists sustain themselves financially, stay true to their values, and actively engage in anti-racist practices?

October 6, 2020 (online)

Workshop led by Byron Au Yong

Activism in the arts has a storied past and continues to thrive in different enclaves around the United States, often with Asians at the forefront of change. We will look at a few of these individuals and organizations in depth. What lessons can we learn from them?

June 26, 2020 (online)

How can Asians in classical music be better advocates and allies for the Black classical music community? There’s a huge presence of Asians in classical music, and Asians hold incredible amounts of influence and possibilities for change. How can we collectively work and speak up to counter white supremacy in a field where conversations relating to race, identity, and culture are often hushed? How can we foster more dialogue among BIPOCs within the field to affect change and create a space where all may thrive? Please join four musicians--Eunbi Kim, Daniel Bernard Roumain, Stanford Thompson, and Hyeyung Julie Yoon--as they converse and tackle these questions together.

January 16, 2020 at the Asian American Writers' Workshop in NYC

Despite a presence in the world of classical music, the experiences of Asian classical musicians often go unexplored. The Asian Musical Voices of America is a platform where these stories can be shared by & for Asian diasporic musicians living & working in the United States. This event is the first gathering & will take place at the Asian American Writers’ Workshop, a literary nonprofit that celebrates Asian diasporic literature & storytelling.